Tuesday, July 10, 2018

How to Dry Age Beef at Home

At the Sausage Maker, we are big fans of meat. We want to help our fellow enthusiasts get the highest possible enjoyment out of a great piece of meat, whether that means recommending the perfect blend of spices and casing; providing the best sausage recipes from around the world; or showing you the newest and most on-target processes, tools, and advice for turning a good cut of meat into a fantastic example of a hand-crafted link. And while we love sausage, of course, there are other ways to go about enhancing a great cut of meat. Curing, smoking, brining, or any other way you can encourage meat to achieve its full, glorious flavor potential is fair game (get it?) for us.

Dry Aging vs. Wet Aging Beef

Which brings us to one of the oldest and most prestigious methods for intensifying the flavor of meat: aging. More specifically, aging cuts of beef. As many of our biggest fans may know, there are two generally accepted methods or styles for aging beef: dry aging and wet aging, with the former being the clear “older sibling” of the pair. Meat has been aged “dry”—also called “hanging out” or just “hanging”—for hundreds, if not thousands, of years. The process involves leaving cuts of meat exposed to air (these days, also under refrigeration) for between 7 and 30 days. “Wet” aging has come about comparatively recently, made possible by technological advances in vacuum sealing and temperature control. In this method, the meat is sealed into airtight plastic packages and left in refrigeration, for usually slightly less time. The difference is that nothing gets in or out of the package—moisture, air, or microbes—and so it needs less management.
The key to both approaches is allowing for enzymes naturally present within the meat to break down the tissue, leading to more tenderness. There is also a change in flavor, with wet aging somewhat intensifying the meat flavor while retaining more of the “metallic” taste associated with fresh meat, whereas dry-aged meat develops a deeper, more concentrated flavor sometimes described as “nutty”, or even with a sharpness occasionally likened to that of blue cheese. There’s plenty of debate about which approach is “better”, and to some extent this will reflect the taste of the individual (whether one prefers the “metallic” flavor of wet aging over the stronger, “nutty” taste produced by dry aging). But in general, the argument comes down to this: Dry aging is the more traditional method, which produces a better, more complex taste and feel, while wet aging is easier, cheaper, and faster, but doesn’t result in meat that is as tasty or tender.

How to Dry Age Steak at Home

So what do we recommend, aging-wise? Well, for dry aging, the Sausage Maker’s digital dry curing cabinet can produce very fine, steakhouse-quality dry-aged steaks (as well as helping you cure salami, capicola, and other sausages). If you’re a serious DIYer, you might even consider building your own with the help of our step-by-step dry aging chamber guide. For those on a more restricted budget, however—or those who want to dip a toe into the dry-aging waters before taking the full plunge—we recommend UMAi Dry aging bags. This product, created by UMAi Dry (also makers of high-quality sausage casing kits) is a single-use, sealable bag in which home chefs can age meat in a standard refrigerator.

How Do Dry Aging Bags Work?

The approach of sealing individual cuts of meat into clear plastic bags and aging them that way may seem similar to wet aging, and this has led to some confusion about the real nature of the UMAi Dry bags. The key difference is permeability to both water and air. The UMAi Dry bag allows moisture to escape from the meat in much the same way it would from a cut hanging or sitting on a rack in a dry-aging cabinet, and unlike a standard wet-aging bag (where part of the point is to have the meat sit in its own serum during aging). At the same time, the UMAi bag allows oxygen from the air to flow past the meat surface while keeping out larger-moleculed air components like nitrogen, as well as harmful microbes. This combination results in a dry-aged style cut, with the shrinking (and flavor concentration) associated with traditional cabinet-style aging, as well as the thick crust on the outside of the meat. Take a look at this demonstration from our friends at Ballistic Barbecue:


And here’s a great grill technique for those steaks once they’ve finished aging:

So what’s our final verdict on aging? In our estimation, UMAi’s dry bag introduces a “third way” between traditional dry aging (in a cabinet) and standard wet aging (in non-permeable sealed bags). Although all three methods have their pros and cons, we think the UMAi bags give the budget-conscious home chef who prefers the taste and texture of dry-aged meat an option that doesn’t require the time, space, or cash outlay of a full dry aging cabinet.

28 comments:

  1. Have you ever tried using the UNAi bags on a venison backstrap?

    ReplyDelete
  2. I have recently did a BBQ party with my colleagues of a web design agency. We have used a dried age beef there. You can save the beef by coating it with the salt. We have did the same and also enjoyed our event too.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I work for Software Company Development i suggest them for dried age beef there. It was fabulous receipt that we enjoyed last night event. This article very helpful for us and also gonna share this article with my friends.

    ReplyDelete
  4. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Casio has been ruling the market since the year 1946. Today is the time when you can locate a plethora of selections below Casio brand. Products such as Watches, Electronic Musical Instruments, Calculators, Electronic Dictionaries, Projectors, Label Printers, Cash Registers, Digital Cameras and a great deal more are amassing significant patron attention.


    casio discount code

    ReplyDelete
  6. Awesome post, I am definitely going to follow your blog. carpet cleaning Orlando

    ReplyDelete
  7. Oh! I love the details, I might choose. Thanks for this procedure

    ReplyDelete
  8. This is my first comment here, so I just wanted to give a quick shout out and say I genuinely enjoy reading your articles. canon printer support

    ReplyDelete
  9. You are AMAZING! Thank you thank you thank you so much for this. I was considering doing the same thing and you’ve just made the task a lot less daunting.


    health magazineus
    Bread makes you fat
    protein foods
    Banana Diet
    Food near me open now
    Hummus

    ReplyDelete
  10. Ohh! thanks for this great procedure. I'll follow this mycoffeemachine.com/

    ReplyDelete
  11. Wow, thank you for sharing this! This will really be helpful! www.sandiegosbesttowing.com/

    ReplyDelete
  12. Wavering! undeniably I have discovered something astonishing, This is the thing that I was checking for a long time. Thankful to you for offering this data to us. Continue sharing new posts. thesis help

    ReplyDelete
  13. I have my own version of it set your cut of beef on top of the wire rack. Then, slide the tray, rack, and beef into the fridge and wait. Wait 2-4 weeks if you're only looking for added tenderness, 4-6 weeks for that famous dry-aged taste, and 6-8 (or more) weeks if you're looking to develop some seriously funky aromas and flavors contact us .

    ReplyDelete
  14. Wow, thanks so much for this! This was really helpful! www.houseflipfunding.com/

    ReplyDelete
  15. Why do a lot of people love eating aged meat. Is it good? Sorry haven't eat one before.

    URL: https://www.aucklandpestcontrolnz.kiwi/

    ReplyDelete
  16. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Nice tips! this kind of article I really like to visit. I appreciate the blog owner.
    URL: https://www.neuromastersacademy.com/

    ReplyDelete
  18. The key effect of dry aging is the concentration and saturation of the natural flavour, as well as the tenderization of the meat texture. The process changes beef by two means. Secondly, the beef's natural enzymes break down the connective tissue in the muscle, which leads to more tender beef.
    about us

    ReplyDelete
  19. Midwifery assignment writing service learners have an advantage of hiring the best midwifery research paper help writer that is familiar with midwifery coursework writing services for their Midwifery Writing Services.

    ReplyDelete
  20. I9 have completed read your post about the saving beef at home but I am living in a village and I know how to dry Beef and save for the next days Thanks for providing a piece of great information about putting Beef for the next days fresh. coursework writing service

    ReplyDelete